Willis’ computer: Photos of victim, necrophilia and murder porn

MUSKEGON, Mich. (WOOD) — Jeffrey Willis had photographs of murder victim Rebekah Bletsch on his computer and her initials on a computer file, along with the date of her death, a witness revealed in a court hearing on Wednesday.

The hearing ended with Muskegon County District Judge Richard Kloote ordering Willis to stand trial for Bletsch’s June 2014 murder.

That was after disturbing — and damaging — details were revealed by a state police computer crimes expert who examined Willis’ computers and external hard drives.

VIDEOS OF NECROPHILIA AND MURDERS

“There were a lot of disturbing files” on Willis’ computers and hard drives, Michigan State Police Sgt. Chris Prevette testified.

They included videos downloaded from the internet of necrophilia, sex with dead people, Prevette told the court. They also included “kidnap and kill” videos, thousands of them, downloaded from the internet, some showing actors playing the roles of killer and victim. Others, Prevette said, were real.

The videos “depicted individuals pulling up alongside of females on the side of the road. When they approached her, that female took off running into a field. Once in the field, they chase after her attack her sexually assault her. There were other videos depicting the same thing where at the end of the video they murder. They show this in an acting way and we also found videos that showed this that are not acting,” he testified.

“Real life?” Muskegon County Prosecutor D.J. Hilson asked.

“They’re real life,” Prevette said.

After the hearing, Hilson said police don’t know who the victims are in the “kidnap and kill” videos or where they’re from, but are working with national and international agencies to find out.

“They will reach out to other channels to see if these particular videos have been identified,” Hilson said.

FOLDER WITH BLETSCH’S INITIALS

On the computer, police said they also found a subfolder entitled VICS — short for victims. That subfolder included a file entitled “RSB,” the initials of the victim.

“Rebekah Sue Bletsch,” Prevette testified.

Prevette said they found a code that includes the date 6-29-14, the date that Bletsch was killed. He said they found photographs of Bletsch, along with wanted posters in her case, along with a photograph of a woman that resembled Bletsch on a bed.

Bletsch’s family filled the courtroom, including her sisters and father, who said they had been warned of the graphic details.

Her father, Nick Winberg, said the details were difficult to hear, but important to bring out.

“That’s the part I want to see — justice,” he said. “She can’t speak for herself, but I can.”

“I’m really looking forward to a conviction knowing this person is off the streets,” he added.

Hilson said the details are the most disturbing he’s dealt with in his 17-year career.

“This man is a very disturbing individual, and I’m very glad that we were able to get him off the streets when we did,” the prosecutor said. “I can’t imagine how many lives we’ve saved.”

THE MURDER OF REBEKAH BLETSCH

On June 29, 2014, neighbors found Bletsch, 36, lying alongside Automobile Road in Dalton Township, north of Muskegon, where she often jogged.

Muskegon County Sheriff’s Deputy Robert Kanaar testified during Wednesday’s hearing that he responded to the scene. He testified he gave her chest compressions and then called for a traffic investigator, believing she was a pedestrian who had been hit by a car. After calling investigators, Kanaar testified he noticed a shell casing in the road and then saw a pool of blood near Bletsch’s body.

Deputy Scott Foster testified Wednesday he discovered two small bullet holes in Bletsch’s head after she had been moved to an ambulance. Later, an autopsy found a third bullet wound. She also had bruises on her wrists, ankles, back and leg.

Retired sheriff’s office Detective Brian Harris testified investigators found two .22-caliber shell casings at the scene the day Bletsch died. He said they returned to the scene the next day after “word came there might be a third bullet wound” and found a third shell casing.

WILLIS ARRESTED AFTER ALLEGED KIDNAPPING

The case went nowhere until the April 2016 kidnapping of a 16-year-old girl, who escaped escaped by jumping from his moving silver minivan.

Detective Matt Schultz, also of the sheriff’s department, testified Wednesday that he investigated the kidnapping and found surveillance video from a blueberry farm near the scene that showed a silver minivan. The license plate of the minivan wasn’t clear in the video, however, so he didn’t know who owned it. He took photos of the van to a car dealer, who said it was a 2005 or 2006 model year. Working with the U.S. Secret Service and other agencies, he narrowed it down to 10 possible minivans in Muskegon County, including the one owned by Willis. He testified that he then showed the 16-year-old a photo lineup and she pointed out Willis as the man who tried to abduct her.

Deputy Foster testified he was part of the team assigned to arrest Willis for the kidnapping on May 17 as he left work at Herman Miller in Spring Lake. He was also the officer who made the traffic stop in Willis’ arrest. Willis was driving a silver minivan, which was towed away as evidence.

Another police officer to testify Wednesday was Michigan State Police Sgt. Thomas Flowers, who worked with the mobile crime unit the night of Willis’ arrest and searched Willis’ minivan, which yielded lots of evidence. He testified he found a lockbox under the front seat with a combination lock. In it, he found a .22-caliber handgun with the serial number filed off, black gloves, handcuffs, syringes a vial of insulin and blue pills. A toolbox was also found, which contained a chain with handcuffs and a large metal hook. Also in Willis’ van, investigators found two video cameras, black leather gloves, photos, more syringes, lubricant, a ball gag and sexual toys.

GUN USED IN BLETSCH MURDER WAS STOLEN

Michelle Schnotala, who worked with Jeffrey Willis for seven years at Herman Miller, testified she owned a .22-caliber handgun and that Willis knew she had one. She said the last time she saw it was over the weekend of Feb. 22, 2013 — more than a year before Bletsch’s murder. The defense asked Schnotala if she ever reported the gun missing. Schnotala said she assumed she’d left it in her attic and that she didn’t know the exact date that it disappeared.

A state police ballistics expert testified that tests showed the shell casings found at Bletsch’s murder scene came from the gun.

Schnotala also told the court that Willis had specifically asked for her to give him something very personal — her underwear.

“He asked for my panties quite a bit, always wanted a pair of my underwear,” Schnotala testified, adding adamantly that she never gave them to Willis.

THE INVESTIGATION INTO JEFFREY WILLIS

Willis is charged with kidnapping and assault for the attempted abduction of the teen girl, and with several counts connected to the creation and possession of child pornography. He previously waived his preliminary hearing in the kidnapping case, and he waived his preliminary hearing on the child porn case on Wednesday. That means both of those cases are also headed to circuit court for trial.

Willis has also been named a person of interest in the disappearance of Jessica Heeringa. He owns a silver minivan similar to the one police were searching for in connection to Heeringa’s disappearance; his co-workers said he frequented her gas station, which is between his home and workplace; and a source said he wasn’t at work in the days after police say she was abducted.

However, a police source said investigators don’t have enough evidence to charge him in the case.

Willis’ cousin Kevin Bluhm was charged with lying to police in the Bletsch murder investigation and also with lying to police in connection to Willis’ alleged involvement in Heeringa’s disappearance.

 

Save

Sharing is caring