Toni Morrison is arguably one of the greatest authors to have ever put pen to pad. Her awards include, but aren’t limited to, a Pulitzer, Nobel Prize, and Presidential Medal of Freedom. She is noted for writing soul-stirring stories of struggle, redemption, overcoming obstacles, and the disparities caused my matters of skin color, ethnicity, and poverty, in America.

Among her critically acclaimed works is Beloved, the story of a slave who escapes to Ohio in search of freedom, but finds herself still a slave to the horrific memories she has from the life she fled. Beloved is highly regarded as one of Morrison’s best works as it is full of vivid imagery, highly suspenseful, and a beautifully told story based off the life of Margaret Garner.

Keeping in mind the horrific circumstances that slaves brought from Africa, as well as their descendants endured, it’s reprehensible to think that even white privilege would lend itself to someone from the Trump family comparing him/herself to any slave in any way whatsoever. Apparently, the Trump privilege is not a respecter of history:

Ivanka Trump considers herself able to identify with the life of a slave. As if that’s not disgusting and disrespectful enough, she goes into detail as to how she is able to relate; she makes this comparison in a book ironically entitled, Women Who Work:  Rewriting the Rules for Success.

A Caucasian female who has never had to work, whose father is currently doing the absolutely most to bring hardship to people who don’t share the privilege his family enjoys, and who can never, will, never, and has never been able to relate to the plight of brown people in America, let alone slaves, compares herself to slaves in a book about working women. Makes sense, right?

Quoting Morrison, Trump says:

‘Freeing yourself was one thing; claiming ownership of that freed self was another.’

Adding insult to injury, Trump uses the quote in a chapter entitled, Working Smarter. Trump clearly has never read Morrison’s book though, for the passage Ivanka quoted is intended to serve as a moral and metaphor of sorts for the difficult life protagonist, Sethe, has lived.

The text is not meant for a wealthy daddy’s girl to use it to draw comparisons to checking emails, going to meetings, and returning calls. Sadly, that’s exactly how Trump uses it. She asks:

‘Are you a slave to your time or the master of it? Despite your best intentions, it’s easy to be reactive and get caught up in returning calls, attending meetings, answering e-mails?’

Rightfully so, Twitter showed Ivanka Trump absolutely no mercy:

@sarahkendzior What in the actual fuck is this fuckery!

@heroinebook @sarahkendzior She reminds me of this Ibsen quote. Or this YA book I read in my tweens. She’s frosting on a cardboard cake.

@sarahkendzior How did this family evolve? I have seen nothing that demonstrates intelligence, leadership or even common fucking sense

@sarahkendzior Weird. I was just saying how being a billionaire heiress is exactly like being beaten and forced to work for free.

On the brightside:  The Trumps are consistent, even if it’s consistently ignorant about history. Earlier this week Ivanka’s father went on about the Civil War and what Andrew Jackson said. One of the biggest problems with Trump’s statement was that Andrew Jackson died long before the Civil War. Credit where it’s due, though, the family doesn’t know history and they’re willing to stand in solidarity to show just how little they know.

Featured Image via Getty/Bloomberg/Contributor

 

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